Tag Archives: offend

Mortal Sin

 

Mortal sin is the greatest evil in the world. It separates us from God. Because of our mortal sins, Jesus Christ suffered agonies and died on the cross. To strengthen our resolution not to commit sin, we should remember also that even a single mortal sin is enough to send us to hell.

 

What is mortal sin? –Mortal sin is a grievous offense against the law of God.

     

  1. Any wilful thought, word, action or omission, in serious violation of God’s law, is a mortal sin. Examples of mortal sin are blasphemy, wilful murder, adultery, arson, robbery, etc. Mortal sin occurs as soon as God is no longer our final end in our thoughts, words, and actions.

    Each mortal sin we commit is a three-fold insult to Almighty God: it insults Him by rebellion or disobedience, by ingratitude, and by contempt.

     

  2. Circumstances of person, cause, time, place, means, object, and evil consequences enhance or decrease the guilt of the sin.

    Thus mortal sins, although all mortal, differ in the weight of their guilt.

Why is this sin called mortal? –This sin is called mortal, or deadly, because it deprives the sinner of sanctifying grace, the supernatural life of the soul.

     

  1. Without sanctifying grace, the soul is displeasing to God, unclean, and can never behold Him or be with Him in heaven.

    Without sanctifying grace, the soul is without God; and without God, the devil makes the soul his habitation. “Know thou and see that it is an evil and bitter thing for thee to have left the Lord thy God” (Jer. 2:19).

     

  2. The sinner loses charity towards God and his fellow-men, and by the weakening of his will and the darkening of his intellect, is liable to fall into other mortal sins.

    The devil cries to his subordinates, “God hath forsaken him; pursue him and take him, for there is none to deliver him” (Ps. 70:11).

     

  3. Without sanctifying grace, the soul is truly “dead”; and if an adult dies in that state, he will suffer the torments of the damned.

    The word “mortal” comes from the Latin mors, which means death. St. John Chrysostom said, “Sinners are dead while they live, and the just live after they are dead.”

Besides depriving the sinner of sanctifying grace, what else does mortal sin do to the soul? –Besides depriving the sinner of sanctifying grace, mortal sin makes the soul an enemy of God, takes away the merit of all its good actions, deprives it of the right to everlasting happiness in heaven, and makes it deserving of everlasting punishment in hell.

     

  1. Man was made for God, and what an awful calamity it would be to become His enemy! It would be as if the food which was made to support and sustain man should all of a sudden turn to poison him instead.

    Through mortal sin, the sinner becomes a stranger to divine love, and to the love of neighbor; his heart turns cold because he has put out the flame of charity by grave sin. His reason, a gift of God, is obscured, and he fails to perceive the things of God. Thus a sinner the more he sins, becomes more insensitive to evil; his will is finally so weakened that all conscience is lost, and he falls into greater and greater sins more and more easily.

    “Adulterers, do you not know that the friendship of this world is enmity with God? Therefore, whoever wishes to be a friend of this world becomes an enemy of God” (Jas. 4:4).

     

  2. During all the time that the sinner remains in mortal sin, all his good works do not help him to heaven: he earns no merits until he gives up his state of mortal sin.

    As the Apostle says, “If I give my body to be burned and have not charity, I am nothing.” One who falls into mortal sin may be compared to a merchant coming into his home port, laden with all kinds of treasures collected from abroad, upon which he has spent years of labor and incalculable wealth. Just as he enters the harbor his ship is torpedoed, and he saves nothing for all his trouble. In a similar manner, one who dies in mortal sin gains nothing, however numerous the good works he may in life have performed.

     

  3. However numerous the merits previously earned by the sinner, however many his good works, if he dies with only one mortal sin on his soul he goes to hell forever.

    Is this not something to be feared? It is because mortal sin presupposes a hatred of God. Let us be reasonable men, and consider the utter folly of selling our birthright, God and heaven, for the mess of pottage that is sin and its effects. “Then he will say to those on his left hand, ‘Depart from me, accursed ones, into the everlasting fire'” (Matt. 25:41).


What three things are necessary to make a sin mortal? –To make a sin mortal, these three things are necessary:

First, the thought, desire, word, action, or omission must be seriously wrong or considered seriously wrong. – The matter must be grave, something very important.

A slight act of vanity or impatience is not serious matter, but murder is. Things seriously evil are known to be such from Sacred Scripture, Tradition, the teachings of the Church, or from their nature.

Second, the sinner must be mindful of the serious wrong. – He must have full knowledge and reflection or attention, and know that what he does is grievous.

The person must know the malice and evil of what he is doing. A man who steals a precious diamond ring in the belief that it is glass has not full knowledge. A man who throws a lighted match thoughtlessly aside may throw it into a gasoline tank and cause an explosion, but he has not full attention. “For I formerly was a blasphemer, a persecutor and a bitter adversary; but I obtained the mercy of God because I acted ignorantly, in unbelief” (1 Tim. 1:13).

Third, the sinner must fully consent to it. -He must do it of his own free will, saying deliberately, “I will do this.”

When one realizing what he is doing, still freely does it, he gives the matter deliberate consent. Therefore infants and idiots cannot commit mortal sin; they cannot fully realize what they do.

Is mortal sin a great evil? –Mortal sin is a great evil, the greatest evil in the world, a greater evil than disease, poverty, or war, because it separates us from God.

“But they that commit sin and iniquity are enemies to their own soul” (Job. 12:10).

     

  1. It is a rebellion against and contempt of God, the blackest ingratitude towards Him.

    Our heavenly Father gave us everything we have, and in return we offend Him. We desecrate His temple. “Do you not know that you are the temple of God and that the Spirit of God dwells in you?” (1 Cor. 3:16). By mortal sin a vile and insignificant creature offends and insults the infinite Creator.

     

  2. It is crucifying Christ again, “since they crucify again for themselves the Son of God and make him a mockery” (Heb. 6:6).

    We can never fully realize the malice of mortal sin. We can get a small idea of it by remembering that God sent His own beloved Son to suffer untold agonies, to save us from its consequences.

     

  3. Mortal sin must be a most terrible thing indeed to make a just and merciful God create hell for the everlasting punishment of the rebellious angels and of sinners who die with even only one mortal sin.

    Even considering only its temporal penalties mortal sin is great folly. Upon it follows moral disquiet; the sinner loses the serenity and cheerfulness of the just soul. “The wicked are like the raging sea, that cannot rest” (Is. 57:20). Sickness and want are often consequences of sin, as well as loss of a good reputation.

This article has been taken from “My Catholic Faith” I am not the author merely the distributor.
God Bless BJS!!

Actual Sin

Christ permitted Himself to be tempted by the devil. After Our Lord’s forty days’ fast in the desert, the devil appeared to Him and tempted Him to gluttony, to pride, and to avarice. But Our Lord resisted the devil and sent him away. Then angels came to minister to Him. God wishes to show us that temptation, far from being a sin in itself, is a source of merit if we resist firmly. Then God will send us His blessings and consolations, and we shall be dearer to Him after our successful fight against temptation.

 

What is actual sin? –Actual sin is any wilful thought, desire, word, action, or omission forbidden by the law of God.

     

  1. There are two general classes of sins: original and actual. Original sin is the kind of sin that we inherit from Adam. Actual sin is the kind of sin that we ourselves commit. In general, when we speak of “sin” we mean actual sin.

    Sin is an offense against God, a violation of His commandments. To sin is to despise God, to disobey Him, to offend Him. One who sins takes the gifts that God has given, and uses them to insult Him.

     

  2. No person exists who does not sin, however holy he may be. The only human being who was created without sin, and never committed sin, was the Blessed Virgin; this was a special privilege bestowed on her because she was to be the Mother of our Saviour.

    St. John says: “If we say that we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us” (1 John 1:8).

    In what way do we fall into sin? –We fall step by step from temptation into sin.

    The different steps at times follow each other rapidly and are accomplished in the twinkling of an eye.

     

  1. Sin is not committed without temptation. First an evil thought comes into the mind. This in itself is not sinful; it is only a temptation.

    A man may be in a jewelry store looking at some jewels. The salesman turns away to talk to someone else, leaving a precious diamond ring on the counter. The thought enters the man’s mind that it would be easy for him to take the ring and walk away unnoticed. This is temptation, not sin.

     

  2. If we do not immediately reject the thought, it awakens in the mind an affection or liking for it.

    If the man in the above example does not resist and reject the thought, but plays with it, and becomes pleased with the idea, he thereby gives partial consent, and commits a slight sin.

     

  3. Next the thought is followed by an evil desire in which we take pleasure.

    If, still playing with the thought, the man wishes that he could take the diamond ring without being noticed, the consent is complete, and he commits a sin in his heart (interiorly).

     

  4. The resolution to commit the sin when occasion presents itself follows. Then the exterior act is committed.

    Finally, tile man glances to see if the salesman is still busy. Then lie takes the ring and walks aivay with it. Thus the wish or desire has been translated into an exterior act. Even should the man be prevented from stealing, he is guilty of grave sin.

    Why is an exterior sin more evil than an interior sin? –An exterior sin is more evil than an interior sin, because it is attended by worse consequences.

     

  1. An exterior sin often causes scandal, and is more severely punished by God here on earth as well as after death.

    Drunkenness reduces the drunkard and his family to poverty and sickness. Impurity destroys the body, sometimes producing insanity. Murder often leads the culprit to the electric chair.

     

  2. And worse, an exterior sin increases the malice of the will, and destroys the sense of shame. The repetition of exterior sins forms the habit of sinning, and vice is formed. The conscience goes to sleep, and the sinner becomes so hardened that he no longer sees the evil and wickedness of his sin.

    Thus it becomes easier and easier for him to commit sins of a worse kind. His state becomes worse and worse until finally he becomes a hardened sinnerwho believes himself sinless.

    Are all evil acts sinful? –Not all evil acts are sinful; there may be times when such acts are not sinful, as:

     

  1. When we do not know that the act is sinful.

    Noe became intoxicated, but committed no sin, because he was not aware of the strength of the wine. So one might by mistake take poison instead of medicine and die, but he would not be guilty of suicide. Such an act is termed a material sin.

     

  2. When the act is done through no fault of our own.

    If one is not aware that a certain day is a day of abstinence, and eats meat, he commits no sin. Again, one might by pure accident and through no negligence on his part drop a loaded revolver. Even if it explodes and kills a person, he is not guilty of murder.

     

  3. When we do not consent to the evil.

    A stronger man may take our hand, and in spite of our refusal and protest force it to drop a lighted match into a gasoline tank. Even if there is an explosion and a whole town is set on fire, we are not guilty of arson. In the same way, as long as one does not consent to an evil thought, it remains a temptation, and he commits no sin.

    When are we guilty of sins which we ourselves do not commit? –We are guilty of sins which we ourselves do not commit when we cooperate with another person’s sins.

     

  1. We share in another’s sin: (a) by counsel; (b) by command; (c) by consent; (d) by provocation; (e) by praise or flattery; (f) by silence; (g) by assistance; (h) by defense or concealment; and (i) by not punishing the evil done.

    Thus rulers, legislative leaders, parents, employers, teachers, superiors, owners of shows and theatres, editors, publishers, and others in a position of responsibility, may easily render themselves guilty of the sins of others. One who is to blame for another’s sin is as guilty as if he had committed the sin himself.

     

  2. One who tempts or provokes another into sin is perhaps the more guilty of the two.

    Our Lord says: “But whoever causes one of these little ones who believe in me to sin, it were better for him to have a great millstone hung around his neck, and to be drowned in the depths of the sea” (Matt. 18:6).

    How many kinds of actual sin are there? –There are two kinds of actual sin: mortal sin and venial sin.

     

  1. Another classification is: (a) sins of thought; (b) sins of desire; (c) sins of word; (d) sins of deed; (e) sins of omission.

    If we take pleasure in thinking proudly of ourselves, we sin by thought. If we cannot rest content because we envy somebody’s clothes and wish we had them, we sin by desire. If we get angry and say angry words to someone, we sin by word. If we are so angry that we begin striking the person, we sin by deed. If we do not do what is our duty, such as going to Mass on Sunday, we sin by omission.

     

  2. Sins are also classified into (a) our own sins; and (b) sins in which we cooperate and for which we are responsible.

    We must not be presumptous and over-confident. We must remember that when we do not sin, it is only through the grace of God. “Let him who thinks he stands take heed lest he fall” (1 Cor. 10:12). A humble distrust of ourselves is a preservative against sin.

This article has been taken from “My Catholic Faith” I am not the author merely the distributor.
God Bless BJS!!