Tag Archives: Mass

Externals of the Mass Lesson 4

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Externals are those things that one can see. The externals of the Mass are the objects used during Holy Mass that you can see. The Church has exact regulations for all the externals of the Mass.

The Altar

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The Altar is the most important object in a Catholic church. On the altar the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass is offered. In the tabernacle of the altar the Blessed Sacrament is kept.

If possible, the top of every altar should be a stone slab. There should be five crosses engraved on this slab. The crosses represent the five wounds of Our Lord. There is one cross in the center and one at each of the four corners.

Sometimes, the top of an altar is not a stone slab. Then an altar stone is used. This altar stone may be as small as a large piece of tile. Five crosses are cut into the top of the altar stone. The crosses are just the same as on a large stone altar.

In the altar stone, or in the top of a stone altar, there is a small box. The box is made of lead. It contains relics of at least two saints who were martyrs.

The altar is always covered with three white cloths of linen. The first two cloths need cover only the top of the altar. Over these cloths a much longer one is placed. This cloth reaches to the floor on both sides. It is the real altar cloth.

Only three things are necessary on an altar. These three things are a crucifix and two candles. The candles must be made of beeswax. They are placed on each side of the crucifix.

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The priest reads from a large book during Holy Mass. This Mass book is called the Missal. It is on the right side of the altar when Mass begins. The Missal is placed on a book rest.

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The water and wine for Mass are put in two cruets. The cruets are little pitchers. They are used with a small dish. The cruets and dish are placed on a table near the altar. Sometimes they are placed on a shelf. When used, this little shelf is on a wall near the altar. At the side of the cruets there is a small white finger towel. This is used by the priest to dry his fingers.

The Vestments

The priest is told just what he should do in dressing for Holy Mass. He has a special prayer to say as he puts on each vestment. The word vestment means a garment that is different from everyday clothes.

Some vestments are plain. Others are very rich. But always vestments are dignified. They are made like clothes people wore hundreds of years ago.

The priest puts the vestments on over his black cassock. The cassock is the long black garment he wears. Vestments are of two kinds, outer vestments and linen vestments.

Outer Vestments

The chasuble is the large outer vestment. Long ago it was much longer. The chasuble and the other outer vestments are always the same color.

The stole is a long narrow vestment. The priest wears it about his neck and crossed on his breast. The stole worn during Holy Mass is made of the same material as the chasuble.

The maniple is worn on the priest’s left arm. It also is made of the same material as the chasuble.

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The Church tells the priest when he is to use different colors. Violet is used during Advent and Lent. White is used during Christmas and Easter time. White is also used on feasts of Our Lord, our Blessed Mother, and for saints who were not martyrs. Red is for the Holy Ghost and for saints who were martyrs. Black is for funerals and for Masses for the dead. Green is used when no special feast is to be celebrated. Sometimes, for special days, vestments of gold or silver cloth may be used. Violet, white, red, black, and green are called liturgical colors.

Linen Vestments

The amice is a white linen color. It is worn by the priest about the neck and over the shoulders.

The alb is the long white vestment. It is very wide. The sleeves reach down to the wrists.

The cincture is a long white cord. The priest ties it around his waist. The cincture holds the alb in place.

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What the Priest Carries

As the priest goes to the altar to offer Holy Mass, he is carrying several objects. Only the outer covering can be seen. The outer covering is called a veil. It is made of the same material and color as the vestments.

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The priest places on the altar the objects he is carrying. He puts them over the altar stone. He does so gently and carefully. He arranges the veil so that everyrhing looks very nice.

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The burse is a hard square folder. It is on top of what the priest carries. The burse is covered with the same material as the vestments. The priest carries the corporal in the burse.

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The corporal is a large square of linen. Before Holy Mass begins, the priests opens the corporal. He places upon it all he has been carrying.

After consecrating the Sacred Host, the priest places it upon the corporal. The chalice also rests upon it. If a drop of the blood of Jesus should spill, it would fall on the corporal. The corporal is a very sacred cloth. No one is allowed to wash it except a priest, or one who is almost ready to be made a priest. No one may touch the corporal until the priest has first washed it. Only then may some one else complete the washing and iron it.

The chalice and paten are under the veil. The paten is a small gold-like plate. On it is the large host. This is the host which is to be consecrated during Holy Mass. The chalice is empty. It is the scared vessel in which the wine will be consecrated. The chalice and paten are always made of gold, or of silver with the inside of the cup gilded.

This is the way the objects are placed under the veil at the beginning of Holy Mass:

1. The chalice stands on the altar.
2. A linen cloth, called the purifactor, is placed across the cup of the chalice. This cloth is folded three times lengthwise. It hangs down on each side. The purificator is used to clean inside the chalice. Like the corporal, the purificator is a very sacred cloth. It also is washed first by the priest.

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3. On the purificator rests the paten. The host is on the paten.
4. The paten is covered with a square piece of starched line. This cover is called the pall. During Holy Mass the priest uses the pall to cover the chalice.

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Taken from The Kingdom of God series The Holy Sacrifice of the Mass by Ellamay Horan. I am not the Author merely the distributor. God Bless BJS!!

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The Sacrifice of the Cross and the Sacrifice of the Mass Lesson 2

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The Bible tells about many sacrifices. Abel offered the finest lamb of his flock to God. Noe offered sacrifice when he came out of the ark. Abraham was ready to obey God and to offer even his son in sacrifice. When an angel stopped Abraham, he offered a ram. From the time of Moses, the priests of the Jews offered sacrifices for the people.

Saint Paul said that the sacrifices offered by the Jews were a shadow of the good things to come. Saint Paul was speaking of the perfect sacrifice. In this sacrifice Jesus, the Son of God, was and would be the victim.

Jesus offered to God the Father His sufferings and death on the cross. This is called that sacrifice of the cross. On the cross Jesus gained merit and made up for the sins of men.

Every day Jesus makes the same offering that He made on the cross. He again offers Himself to God the Father. He offers His sufferings and death on the cross. He does This In the Sacrifice of the Mass. Our Lord applies to us the merits of His death on the cross. No better victim, no greater gift, could be offered to God. The victim in the Sacrifice of the Mass is Our Lord Himself.

The Mass is the same sacrifice as the sacrifice of the cross. There is only one difference. The way in which the sacrifice is offered is different. On the cross Our Lord shed His Blood. In the Mass there is no shedding of blood. There is no death. Jesus offers Himself to God under the appearances of bread and wine.

The first Sacrifice of the Mass was offered by Our Lord at the Last Supper. He did it in this way. He changed bread and wine into His body and blood. He offered Himself to God the Father. He said: “This is My body which is given for you; this is My blood which is shed for you.”

Jesus made the apostles priests at the Last Supper. At that time He gave them the power to change bread and wine into His body and blood. He said: Do this in Remembrance of Me.” And the priest does this every day in the Sacrifice of the Mass.

When I pray the Mass with the priest, I offer Jesus to God the Father. I also offer myself to God the Father. During Holy Mass, God the Father wishes to give me a gift. He wishes to give me His Son in Holy Communion. This gift is food for my soul. Our Lord Himself said: “Except you eat the flesh of the Son of man and drink His blood, you shall not have life in you.” Our Lord meant the life of grace which I must have to belong to the kingdom of God.

Taken from The Kingdom of God series The Holy Sacrifice of the Mass by Ellamay Horan. I am not the Author merely the distributor. God Bless BJS!!

​On the Commandments of the Church 

Taken from The Sinner’s Guide by the Venerable Louis of Granada chap. 38

Besides these sins against the Commandments of God there are those against the commandments of the Church, which also impose upon us a grave obligation. Such are the precepts to hear Mass on Sundays and holy days of obligation; to confess our sins at least once a year, and to receive the Holy Eucharist at Easter or thereabouts; to pay tithes to our pastor, and to observe the days of fasting and abstinence prescribed by the Church. 
The precept of fasting is binding from the age of 21 and upwards; that of abstinence obliges all who have attained the age of reason. The sick, the convalescent, nursing women, women in pregnancy, those whose labors are severe, and those who are too poor to afford one full meal a day, are exempt from the law of fasting. There may be other lawful reasons for dispensation, for which the faithful ought to apply to their pastor or confessor, and not take it upon themselves to set aside the law of the Church.
The difference between abstinence and fasting should be remembered. By fasting we mean eating only one full meal in the day, with a slight collation in the evening. By abstinence we mean giving up the use of flesh-meat. It should be borne in mind, therefore, on Ember days and at other times of fast, that the law is not fulfilled by simply abstaining from meat. Unless you are excused by some of the reasons given above or by dispensation, you must observe the fast by eating only one full meal, with the collation in the evening, and a warm drink, with a cracker or small piece of bread, in the morning.
In regard to hearing Mass, we must endeavor to be present at the Holy Sacrifice not only in body but in mind, with silence and recollection, having our thoughts fixed upon the mystery of the altar, or upon some other pious subject. The recital of devout prayers, especially the Rosary, is an excellent means of keeping ourselves united with God. If we are at the head of a house we must be careful to see that all under our charge hear Mass, not only on Sundays, but also on holy days. Too much laxity regarding holy days is apt to prevail among those who earn their bread by the sweat of their brow. They should remember that the obligation to hear Mass on a holy day is the same as the obligation to hear it on Sunday. Consequently, they must make serious and sincere efforts to comply with this duty. To attend an early Mass may involve the loss of a little sleep, but they should remember that these holy days occur but seldom, and that they must do something to atone for their sins and to merit the kingdom of Heaven.
Parents and employers will have a severe account to render to God if they cause or permit those confided to their care to neglect this sacred duty. When there is a just reason, such as the care of the sick or any other pressing necessity which prevents Mass, we are released from the obligation.

God Bless BJS!!

Signs that a Catholic is tainted with Liberalism

 

Liberalism is the belief that one creed is as good as another, under the false plea of liberty of conscience. It is based on unrestricted exercise of the individual’s reason upon the subject matter of Revelation. The individual or sect interprets as it pleases, rejecting or accepting what it chooses. The origins of Liberalism stem from Protestantism, which rejected the principle of authority in religion. Liberalism leads to the belief that no creed is just as good as any. Religious beliefs or unbelief become mere matters of opinion. Liberalism severs the bond which binds men to God and seeks to build human society on the foundations of man’s absolute independence. Liberalism is basically rationalism; the doctrine of the absolute sovereignty of human reason.

 

In short, Liberalism is the dogmatic affirmation of the absolute independence of the individual and of the social reason. Catholicity is the dogma of the absolute subjection of the individual and of the social order to the revealed law of God. One doctrine is the exact antithesis of the other, so Liberalism and Catholicism are impossible to reconcile in any way.

 

Causes of Liberalism:

  • Corrupt morals due to theater, literature, public education etc
  • Journalism through the secular press, secret societies, literature, arts, science, politics etc
  • General ignorance in matters of religion
  • Secular education that removes God

 

Effects of Liberalism:

  • Removal of religion from society
  • Supremacy of the state
  • Marriage sanctioned and legitimized by the state alone
  • Divorce laws
  • Socialism/Communism
  • Unrestricted immorality

 

Why Liberalism is a mortal sin (if not out of ignorance):

  • Violates all of the 10 Commandments
  • Within it are comprehended all heresies
  • Repudiates dogma altogether and substitutes opinion
  • Refuses to acknowledge the authority of the Pope and jurisdiction of Jesus Christ over society

 

Condemnations:

  • Liberalism of every degree and all forms has been formally condemned by the Church
  • Upon its appearance during the French Revolution, it was condemned by Pius VI (1775-1799)
  • Later, Liberalism infected all the countries of Europe. Gregory XVI (1831-46) explicitly condemned Liberalism
  • Pope Pius IX (1846-78) later condemned Liberalism multiple times, most notably in the Syllabus of Errors (1864)
  • Liberalism was also condemned by Pope Leo XIII, Pope St. Pius X, and Pope Pius XI

 

3 Types of Liberals:

  1. Extreme Liberals – easily recognized, they do not attempt to deny or conceal their perversity. They are declared enemies of the Pope, priests, and everything ecclesiastical. They are revolutionists, socialists, and anarchists. They glory in living a life devoid of all religion
  2. Moderate Liberals – just as bad as Extreme Liberals, but take good care not to appear so (making them the most dangerous of the three). Social conventionalities and good manners are everything to them. They do not detest the Pope and may even admire him. They may even admire priests, especially those who have caught the twang of modern progress. They may even go to Church and approach the Sacraments, but their maxim is to live as a Christian in the Church, and to live as the world lives outside the Church. They die with a priest on one side, and infidel literature on the other, and imagine that their Creator will applaud this breadth of mind
  3. Quasi Liberals (Catholics tainted with Liberalism)– generally good people and sincerely pious; but liberal in everything they say or write. They reason, speak and act as Liberals without knowing it. Their strong point is charity. To smother evil under an abundance of good is their favorite principle. From the Gospel they are careful to cite only positive texts. They save the treasures of their tolerance and charity for the sworn enemies of the Faith, and for the most heroic defenders of the Faith, they have only sarcasm and abusive language. They use hit and run tactics rather than debate

 

In summary, the extreme Liberal roars his Liberalism, the moderate Liberal mouths it, and the tainted Catholicwhispers and sighs it.

 

Signs that a Catholic is tainted with Liberalism (false Catholicity)

  • He subjects commands and teachings of the Pope to the scrutiny of his own intellect
  • He considers the Church “out of date”, with the hope that it will catch up with the modern spirit of progress
  • He accepts Revelation based on the “superiority” of his own reason, not on the superiority of God
  • He accepts the magisterium, but not as the sole authorized founder of divine truth, but also of his private judgment
  • He makes excuses or apologizes for the past decisions of the Catholic Church
  • He refuses any involved discussion on the subject of Catholicism, or if he appears interested, he will bow out of the discussion before its conclusion (given that Liberalism is derived of nothing but contradictions)
  • He believes the Church’s infallibility may be determined by human science
  • He believes no one can impose upon him any belief which his individual judgment does not measure as perfectly rational
  • If he doesn’t believe a teaching of the Church, he will say it is “not infallible”. If the teaching appears infallible, he will say it must be taken in a very modified sense
  • Following the principle of toleration, he classifies doctrines of enemies of the Church as being due to differences of temperament, education, etc., and concludes that they should be condoned
  • He forgets the Divine and supernatural character of the Church and instead looks at it as a simple human institution
  • So as not to appear “intolerant”, and to appease both sides, he finds it admirable for the private individual to be subject to the law of God, and at the same time believes the state must stand neutral and impartial; a blatant contradiction
  • His piety is limited to Pietism, often seen in people who seek in their devotions only the sentimental emotions of which they themselves are able to be the source
  • In his desire to appear impartial, he tolerates and even praises books and movies that contain liberal content, or that contain praise of non-Catholic religions or other non-Catholic subjects just because Catholic content may also be included within (books of such a kind would normally go on the Index of Forbidden Books)
  • He keeps company with other people known to be tainted with Liberalism
  • He declares that other Catholics do not have the authority to make a moral judgment of heresy or error against other persons or writings. Note: There is a difference between making a personal moral judgment and the Church making an official declaration. It has always been normal procedure in the Catholic Church for moral judgments of the faithful to first ring the warning bell against errors, which later leads to the Church pronouncing the final, decisive and solemn sentence on the matter
  • Instead of being appreciative of correction, he calls other Catholics “uncharitable” or “of bad will” if they try to point out any of the above liberal traits in another person

This was taken from http://www.faithfulcatholics.com I am not the Author merely the distributor. God Bless BJS!!

​The Catholic Eastern Church; Rites

 

The essential acts of the Liturgy are three: the prayers of the priesthood in the Divine Office (represented by the first angel), the Mass (represented by the second angel), and the sacraments (represented by the third angel). The term “rite” is sometimes used to refer to the liturgy according to some definite custom and language. “Rite” may also designate in a narrow sense some particular liturgical ceremony; in this way we have the “rite of Baptism”, etc.

 

    What is the Catholic Eastern Church? –It is that part of the Church in the East which, although using liturgies and rites differing from those of the Latin (or Western) Church centered at Rome, subscribe to the same doctrines, and recognize the same Sovereign Pontiff, thus belonging to the same Universal and True Church.The Catholic Eastern Church includes the following: Byzantines, Syrians, Copts, Ethiopians, Chaldeans, Armenians, Malabarese, and Maronites. 

  1. At the beginning of the fourth century there was one Church, one in doctrine as well as in obedience to the Sovereign Pontiff, the Bishop of Rome. Even then, however, there was no uniformity in observances, ceremonies, rites.Our Lord had sent the Apostles to different parts, and their followers had stuck to the doctrines, but had varied the observances and rites, in accordance with the particular inclinations of the people in the region. The languages used were naturally extremely varied; the Mass was the same Sacrifice instituted by Our Lord (in Aramaic), but it must have been said in quite a variety of languages. 
  2. Then political dissension within the Roman Empire led to its division into East and West. Religious organization, following political developments, led to the separation of first the Greek, then the Russian Orthodox Church. These schismatical churches denied the authority of the Pope, who lived in the West as Bishop of Rome. Otherwise they continued to practice the True Religion just as Christ and the Apostles had taught. They administered the sacraments, celebrated Mass, and followed other observances.
  3. Within the Catholic Eastern Church, only the Maronite Church has never been in schism. With the passing of the centuries, those in schism divided and subdivided. Then, chiefly since the 16th and, 17th centuries, most of them returned to the unity of the True Church.The Catholic Eastern Church continues to use different rites and observances, some of which even antedated those of Rome, as having been there, long before the schisms. Thus today the groups in the Eastern Church have their own discipline and customs, the most notable of which is that with them Mass (called “Holy Liturgy”) is said in the language peculiar to the church in which it is being said: whether Slavonic, Rumanian, Syriac, Arabic, Armenian, Greek, Coptic, Ethiopic, or Georgian.Other differences of practice are: administration of the Holy Eucharist to the faithful in both forms of bread and wine, the use of leavened bread for Holy Mass, Baptism by immersion, bowing from the waist with a sweep of the arm instead of a genuflection before the Blessed Sacrament. 
  4. Groups in the Eastern Church are chiefly those under the jurisdiction of the Patriarchs of Alexandria, Antioch, Jerusalem, and Constantinople. In the fifth century there were five patriarchates: these four composing the Eastern Church, and the Patriarchate of Rome alone in the West.In those days there were clear-cut geographical divisions of patriarchates; an Eastern Catholic was born within the limits of his patriarchate. Today one belongs to his rite wherever he goes, and his children inherit his rite. In the United States there are two dioceses of Eastern Catholics: one of Philadelphia (Ukranian Greek) to which some 316,800 Catholics belong; and another of Pittsburgh (composed of Russians, Hungars, and Croats) , to which some 315,200 Catholics belong. If Canada is included, almost a million among us are of the Eastern Church. 
  5. The Catholic Eastern Church is a living proof of the universality of the Catholic Church. The matter (including the doctrines, faith and morals) is unchanging; but the manner (including rubrics and rites, custom and practice, the externals) may change. The Church organization is malleable; but the fundamentals and essentials, the doctrines, are unchanging anywhere.Thus Catholics under the Patriarchate of Rome in the United States have only six holydays of obligation; the Ukranian Catholic here has to observe twenty holydays of obligation. His Christmas, though also December 25th, falls on our January 7th, because he uses a different calendar. In the Eastern Churches, the married clergy can be found as often as the celibate, because married men can be ordained and retain their wives. If the wife of a married priest dies, he cannot remarry; a bachelor who is ordained cannot marry later. Bishops are required to be either widowers or single.Unity of religion does not mean uniformity of rite. Even in the Latin Church under the Patriarch of Rome, there are variations, all dating no later than the fourteenth century. As Pope Benedict XIV said: “Eastern Christians should be Catholics; they do not need to become Latins.” Externals may vary; but the core is one.
    What is liturgy, and what is rite? –Liturgy comprises a public act intended for the worship of God; rite is the manner of observing the act.At present, however, the two terms are used indiscriminately and interchangeably. Strictly speaking, “liturgy” now refers to the rite of Holy Mass. 

  1. The Roman Rite is for all practical purposes the universal rite used in the Western Church. In it Latin is used.During the period of persecutions, and on account of the difficulty of communication, variety in practices was the natural and common thing. When the Church became better organized, practices became more uniform. In the Latin Church rites practically became uniform in 1570 with the publication of the Roman Missal; even today a few variations remain. 
  2. The Byzantine Rite, after the Roman, is the most widely-used in the Church, being found in Russia, Greece, the Balkans, and south Italy. Greek is the language principally employed, but Georgian, Slavonic, and Roumanian are likewise used.The Orthodox Eastern Church belongs to this rite. Originally, it was of Constantinople; it is based on the rite of St. James of Jerusalem, and was reformed by St. Basil and St. John Chrysostom. Modified for use in Russia, this Rite is termed Ruthenian. 
  3. Other Asian Rites are: the Antiochean, Chaldean, and Armenian; in their entirety or modified, they are employed in the East.The Antiochean Rite is the source of many derived rites; it traces its origin to St. James of Jerusalem. The Syrians, Chaldeans, Malabarese, and Maronites use derivations. The Chaldean Rite is used by the Chaldeans and Malabarese. Syriac is the principal language used in both these rites. The Armenian Rite is in use among Armenians, found in the Levant, Italy, and Austria. The Armenian tongue is used. It is the Greek Liturgy of St. Basil. 
  4. In African Catholic churches, the principal rite used is the Alexandrian. This is called the “Liturgy of St. Mark”; but the original has been greatly modified. The Coptic and Ethiopian Churches use it.The Catholic Copts are under the Patriarch of Alexandria, living in Cairo. Old Coptic and Arabic are the languages used in their liturgy: The EthiopianChurch uses a version of the Liturgy of St. Mark; it is as a whole the same as that of the Copts.The ceremonies of these Rites may indeed seem strange to us of the Latin Rite. But the bishops and priests are real bishops and priests, though vested differently; the Mass and Sacraments are genuine, though performed with an unknown ritual. The Church in the East is the same Church in the West, the same founded by Jesus Christ, the One True Catholic Church.

This article has been taken from “My Catholic Faith” I am not the author merely the distributor.God Bless BJS!!

​The Living Church

 

In spite of all kinds of persecutions, the Church, under the guidance of the Holy Ghost, has continued to spread all over the world. It has obeyed strictly the command of Our Lord to the Apostles: “Go and make disciples of all nations.” Everywhere men have listened to its voice, believing the warning of Christ, “He that believeth not shall be condemned.”

 

    Give a short summary of the history of the Church for the almost two thousand years of its existence –The following is a brief summary: 

  1. The first 400 years. The Apostles dispersed to different countries in order to carry out Christ’s command to teach. The Apostles baptized, preached, and ruled in various countries to which they were sent. They appointed bishops and priests to rule and minister to the faithful.In spite of sufferings and persecutions they persevered, until finally they sealed their faith by martyrdom. Peter and Paul were especially interested in the conversion of the Roman Empire, the mightiest and also most wicked empire of ancient days.The morals of the Romans were extremely debased; the evil was spreading from the Imperial City of Rome throughout the vast empire. In Rome alone some 30,000 different “gods” and “goddesses” were worshipped, many of them for their very immorality. So close was the union of the pagan religion and the empire that to attack the religion was to be considered a traitor to Rome. For this reason the full force of the empire was set against the new religion of the Christians. But the Fisherman did not falter: Peter battled with all his might. He and Paul were both martyred; but others rose to continue the battle for Christ, which lasted for nearly 300 years.Persecution followed upon persecution, numbering ten unsurpassed in ferocity. The severest were those under Nero (64-68) and Diocletian (303-305). The latter condemned to death some two million Christians. But the more they were persecuted, the faster they increased. Tertullian says: “The blood of martyrs is the seed of Christianity.”

    At last, in 313 A.D., the banners of Christianity were flung out in victory; peace was granted by the Edict of Milan. Later, Constantine the Great made Christianity the State religion (324 A. D.) He was led to this step when he conquered in battle after seeing in the heavens a luminous cross with the words In hoc signo vinces (In this sign thou shalt conquer). His saintly mother, St. Helena, had also a great influence on his conversion.

     

  2. The second 400 years. Before sixty years had passed after the Edict of Milan, hordes of barbarian Huns, Goths, Vandals, and Visigoths, numbering millions, started moving from the north into the civilized European countries. City after city surrendered until Rome itself was taken, and the darkness of barbarism covered the continent. But the missionaries and teachers of the Church mingled with the barbarians, returned with them to their countries, and brought light once more out of darkness.St. Patrick was sent to Ireland, and converted that nation to Christianity. St. Augustine in England and St. Boniface in Germany changed those nations into followers of the cross of Christ. The idol worshipping Franks followed their king Clovis into the Christian fold. At the end of four centuries, the cruel and savage barbarians of Italy, Spain, France, Germany, England, and Ireland were Christians, civilized, progressive, settled in peaceful cities, building churches, carrying on trade. 
  3. The third 400 years. In the seventh century Mohammed had begun to propagate his doctrines among the Arabian tribes. His was a conversion by the sword: a great part of Asia, North Africa, Spain, and the islands of the Mediterranean were overrun and conquered to Mohammed’s Allah. At last Mohammedanism broke into France.In a memorable nine-day battle in 732 A. D., the French Christians under Charles Martel defeated the Mohammedans at Tours, and thus stopped their incursions into France. But in the next century the Mohammedans entered and sacked Rome itself, even St. Peter’s. However, the Church carried on and finally repelled the invader.The fall of Jerusalem into the hands of the Mohammedans in the eleventh century gave impetus to the Crusades, during which Christian armies went to free the Holy Places from the infidels. There were seven Crusades in all, from 1095 A.D., to 1254 A.D. Among the outstanding leaders we may mention: Godfrey de Bouillon, Frederick Barbarossa, Richard the Lionhearted, and St. Louis of France. 
  4. The fourth 400 years. The Christian rulers of Europe, upon becoming more powerful, began to look with envy on the Pope’s authority, and to encroach upon it. Although the Crusades had had good effects, too much interest in material preparations caused a relaxation in spiritual life; heresy often attacked the Church. Berengarius denied the Real Presence; followed the Greek schism, the Albigensian heresy, and the heresies of Wycliff and Huss, who denied the authority of the Church. Finally, in the sixteenth century, the general laxness and spirit of revolt culminated in open defiance against Church authority, and the Protestant Revolt swept Europe.An Augustinian monk, Martin Luther, in 1517 made an open attack on the doctrine of Indulgences. When he was effectively refuted by Doctor John Eck in a public argument, Luther became enraged, and more active in propagating his errors. Because his doctrines appealed to human vanity and weakness, he attracted many followers. The princes. who envied the papal authority, threw in their lot with Luther. The Bible was declared the only rule of faith, so, that no one would any longer be dependent on Church authority, but could interpret the word of God as he pleased for himself. The vicious were readily won over by the doctrine that man cannot prevent sin on account of natural corruption and the absence of free will.Revolt spread from Germany to other countries. In Switzerland John Calvin followed in Luther’s footsteps, and began Calvinism. In Scotland John Knox was the propagator of Protestantism. In England, Henry VIII’s desire to change wives was the immediate cause for the establishment of the Anglican Church. Denmark, Holland, Norway, and Sweden were all swept into heresy by their rulers.But out of the pains of the Protestant revolt, the Church came forth stronger and purified. In the meantime, newly discovered countries were converted. The Portuguese and Spaniards were the pioneers in this missionary enterprise. The discoveries of new lands, to which Catholic missionaries went, resulted in the gain of more millions for the Church than had been lost in Protestantism.

     

  5. The last 400 years. Many in Europe returned to the Church; more were gained in the Americas. Protestantism has continued to attack the Church; the paganism bred from the spirit of laxity and revolt is another enemy. Open warfare goes on in Russia and satellite countries. Still the Church continues to grow, the greatest single religious body in history.In 1954 missionaries of Mother Church can be found in the most remote portions of the globe, working patiently to bring souls to Christ. They go where no other foreigners would go. At present there are about 30,000 priests, 12,000 lay brothers, and 60,000 Sisters working in the foreign missions. The missions are supervised and supported by the Societies for the Propagation of the Faith and the Holy Childhood.At present the Church has a membership of about 425,000,000 in all parts of the world. They are under the direction of some 420,000 priests, 2,200 Prelates, and one Head, the Pope. They form the greatest body having a single religious faith. The different Protestant denominations number about two hundred million all together. The schismatic Eastern Christians total about 150 millions.

This article has been taken from “My Catholic Faith” I am not the author merely the distributor.God Bless BJS!!

​The Promise of the Redeemer

Second Article of the Apostles’ Creed

 

 

Immediately after the Fall, God promised a Redeemer to Adam. He forgave man, although He had not forgiven the rebel angels. He was more merciful to man than to the angels. In making the promise, God spoke of the Blessed Virgin, who was to be the Saviour’s Mother.

      Did God abandon man after Adam fell into sin? –God did not abandon man after Adam fell into sin, but promised to send into the world a Saviour to free man from his sins and to reopen to him the gates of heaven.God could have abandoned man as a consequence of Adam’s sin; then the human race would have suffered eternal separation from Him. 

    1. The promise was first made to Adam before God sent him out of Paradise. God said to the serpent who had tempted Eve: “I will put enmities between thee and the woman, and thy seed and her seed; she shall crush thy head” (Gen. 3:15)In this passage, the woman spoken of is the Blessed Virgin Mary. Her seed is Our Lord Jesus Christ. He was the Redeemer promised by God. God said that there would be complete enmity between Our Lord with His Mother on one side, and the devil with his followers on the other. 
    2. This promise was renewed several times to the Patriarchs of the Old Testament: to Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and David. Because Abraham remained true to the worship of God in the midst of idolatry, God led him to Canaan. As a reward for his obedience, God promised, “I will make of thee a great nation … and in thee shall all the kindred of the earth be blessed” (Gen. 12:2,3). This promise was repeated twice.The same promise “in thy seed shall all the nations be blessed” was repeated to Abraham’s son Isaac, and to Isaac’s son Jacob. Finally, hundreds of years later, God commanded the prophet Nathan to repeat to King David the very same promise, “He shall build a house to My name, and I will establish his kingdom forever” (2 Kings 7:13) 
    3. Later, God sent the Prophets. Through them He foretold many things about the Redeemer: about His birth, His Person, His sufferings. His death, and His final glory.God enlightened the Prophets so that they could speak in His name to the Jews or Israelites’ the descendants of Abraham. There were about seventy prophets, the last being Malachias, who lived some 450 years before Christ. 
    4. God chose the Jews as the people among whom the promised Saviour would live; for this reason we call the Jews the “chosen people”. God prepared them for the coming of the Saviour: by heavy trials, by severe laws, by miracles, by prophecies.The selection of the Jews did not mean rejection by God of the other nations. Every renewal of God’s promise recalled blessings in which all were to share. Even among other nations there were just men, In Greece, Socrates spoke against the worship of idols. Holy Job lived in Arabia. The Magi were of the East. Vergil the poet prayed the virgin-born Son to come and reign over His people.
      Why did God wait thousands of years before sending the Redeemer? –God wished men to realize the enormity of sin. 

    1. God wished men to see how low they could sink without His help. He wanted the world to prepare for the Redeemer.Men became so wicked that God destroyed all in the Deluge, except Noe and his family. God permitted men to sink into the deepest misery, so that they might be roused to a longing for the promised Saviour. When the Saviour at last came, all nations were sunk in idolatry and wickedness except the Jews. Even among the Jews there was continuous dissension and sin. 
    2. From the time of Adam the true religion was preserved till the advent of the promised Saviour by the patriarchs, prophets and other holy men inspired by God to teach and lead his Chosen People.In spite of the imperfection of the old religion, there was always only onetrue religion. It was but a shadow of the perfection that was to come, but was the true religion before Christ: the Jewish Faith.
      Who is the Saviour of all men? –The Saviour of all men is Jesus Christ.Men would know the Saviour by certain signs which God revealed through the Prophets. 

    1. Of His advent the Prophets spoke:
         

      1. The Messias was to be born in Bethlehem, when the Jews were no longer free.“And Thou, Bethlehem Ephrata, art a little one among the thousands of Juda: out of thee shall he come forth unto me that is to be the ruler in Israel: and his going forth is from the beginning, from the days of eternity” (Mich. 5:2). “The scepter shall not be taken away from Juda, nor a ruler from his thigh, till he come that is to be sent, and he shall be the expectation of nations” (Gen. 49:10) 
      2. The Messias was to be born of a virgin of the House of David.“Behold, a virgin shall conceive, and bear a Son, and his name shall be called Emmanuel” (Is. 7:14) 
      3. The Messias would be preceded by a precursor who would preach in the desert.“The voice of one crying in the wilderness: Prepare ye the way of the Lord: make straight in the desert the paths of our God” (Is 40:3). 
      4. A new star was to announce the birth of the Messias; He would be adored by kings from distant lands bringing Him gifts.“A star shall rise out of Jacob, and a scepter shall spring up from Israel” (Numb. 24:17). “The kings of Tharsis and the islands shall offer presents: the kings of the Arabians and of Saba shall bring gifts” (Ps. 71:10) 
      5. Many children would be put to death at the time of His birth.“A voice was heard on high of lamentation, or mourning, and weeping, of Rachel (representing the Jews) weeping for her children, and refusing to be comforted, because they are not” (Jer. 31:15).

       

    2. Of the person of the Messias the Prophets spoke: He was to be the Son of God. He would work great miracles, and teach the people. He would he King of a new kingdom, which was not to be destroyed, and was to include all nations.“The Lord hath said to me: Thou art my Son; this day have I begotten Thee” (Ps. 2:7). “Then shall the eyes of the blind be opened, and the ears of the deaf shall be unstopped. Then shall the lame man leap as a hart, and the tongue of the dumb shall be free” (Is. 35:5-6). “The God of heaven will set up a kingdom that shall never be destroyed … and it shall consume all these kingdoms, and itself shall stand forever” (Dan. 2:44). 
    3. Of His sufferings the Prophets spoke:He was to enter Jerusalem riding on an ass. He would be betrayed by one who ate at the same table with Him. He would he abandoned, mocked, beaten, spat upon, scourged, crowned with thorns, and given gall and vinegar to drink. Lots would be cast for His garments. His hands and feet would be pierced with nails. He would die between two evildoers. 
    4. All the prophecies were fulfilled in Jesus Christ. He is the Redeemer, the Saviour that God in His mercy had promised.The angels announced Him as the Redeemer to the shepherds when He was born, and to St. Joseph in a vision. “For God so loved the world that he gave his only-begotten Son” (John 3:16)

This article has been taken from “My Catholic Faith” I am not the author merely the distributor.
God Bless BJS!!

    Novus Ordo “Messes”

    Here are just a few other Novus Ordo Messes documented:

      The Protestant-Masonic-Pagan Novus Ordo Service

      Photo

      Title & Description

      Performer

      Location

      Date of Photo

      Afro Mess “Afro” Mess
      during which people dressed as African “gods” and “goddesses”, while a pagan priestess acted as an acolyte of the presbyter
      Novus Ordo Presbyter VIIIth Encounter of UNESCO Schools, Sao Luis do Maranhao, Brazil November 17, 2001
      Army Mess “Army” Mess
      in which the performer of the Mess wears a camouflage smock and “consecrates” kommunion kookies in a wicker basket atop an army jeep
      Presbyter Norman Oswald Milwaukee, Wisconsin June 6, 2004
      Balloon Mess “Balloon” Mess
      in which the celebrant and congregation dance to a rock band holding helium balloons
      Newchurch Cardinal Christoph Schönborn Wolfsthal, Austria November 19, 2008
      Barefoot Mess “Barefoot” Mess
      in which teenagers sit around the Novus Ordo “table” in T-shirts, shorts, and bare feet
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Novus Ordo Parish June 9, 2003
      Beach MessBeach Mess Presbyter “Beach” Mess
      in which Mess is performed on the sand of a beach with the congregation dressed (actually partially undressed) in beach and swimwear
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Novus Ordo Parishes,
      Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts
      October 11, 2003
      Bikers Mess 1Bikers Mess 2 “Bikers” Mess
      in which motorcyclists recline on their “hogs” dressed in T-shirts and jeans, bandana head coverings, boots, and black leather
      Archbishop Timothy Dolan Holy Hill,
      Milwaukee, Wisconsin
      August 30, 2003
      Black Culture Mess “Black Culture” Mess
      in which Africans dressed in native skirts dance around the Novus Ordo “table”
      Roger Cardinal Mahony Cathedral,
      Los Angeles, California
      May 10, 2003
      Buddha Mess “Buddha” Mess
      in which the Mess is performed on a small table before a much larger Buddha altar
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Nuns In the West Conference, Hacienda Heights, California May 23-26, 2003
      Bum's Mess “Bum’s” Mess
      in which Mess is performed on a picnic table, and some of the participants come in undergarments
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Plainfield, Illinois Summer 2002
      Camouflage Mess “Camouflage” Mess
      in which vestments of camouflage material, designed by a Lutheran minister, are used
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Iraq April 2003
      Camp Mess “Camp” Mess
      in which “Mess” is performed on an overturned canoe
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Poland 2004
      Campfire Mess “Campfire” Mess
      in which “Mess” is performed on a toolbox by a presbyter “vested” in hiking clothes in front of a campfire
      Novus Ordo Presbyter St. Andrew Boboli Academy,
      Poland
      2004
      Cardboard Box Mess “Cardboard Box” Mess
      in which Mess is said on a cardboard box
      Jesuit Presbyter World Youth Day,
      Toronto, Canada
      Summer 2002
      Carnival Mess “Carnival” Mess
      in which Newchurchers dressed as carnival fools stand around the table holding hands
      Novus Ordo Cardinal Karl Lehmann St. Pius Church,
      Bad Neuenahr-Ahrweiler, Germany
      July 29, 2007
      Charismatic Mess “Charismatic” Mess
      in which members of the congregation bark like dogs, oink like pigs, and roll on the floor
      Novus Ordo Presbyter University of Steubenville,
      Steubenville, Ohio
      October 20, 1997
      Cheesehead Mess “Cheesehead” Mess
      in which the performer of the Mess wears a mitre of cheddar cheese
      Archbishop Timothy Dolan Milwaukee, Wisconsin September 26, 2002
      Chinese Tea Mess “Chinese Tea” Mess
      in which Chinese tea is offered at the Offertory, and ancestors are worshipped at a pagan-style side altar
      Novus Ordo Bishop Allen Vigneron Our Lady of the Rosary,
      Union City, California
      February 7, 2004
      Circus Mess “Circus” Mess I
      in which the Mess is performed by presbyter and deacon vested in circus colors and sporting red clown’s noses
      Novus Ordo Presbyter and Deacon St. Michael, Wuerzburg, Germany August 7, 2005
      Circus Mess “Circus” Mess II
      in which the Mess is performed by a presbyter in a clown chasuble and consecrating what looks like a layer cake and Kool-Aid in plastic cups
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Jerry Hogan Worcester, Massachusetts October 17, 2011
      Clown Mess “Clown” Mess
      in which the performer is “vested” as a clown and engages in “sacred laughter”
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Brian Joyce Christ the King Church, California September 1, 2002
      Coffee Mess “Coffee” Mess
      in which coffee is used for “communion”
      Novus Ordo Presbyter St. William’s Church,
      Louisville, Kentucky
      October 4, 2002
      Come As Your Are Mess “Come as You Are” Mess
      in which the recipients of the “cookie” come up dressed as clowns
      Novus Ordo Presbyter John Johnson St. James the Greater Church,
      Dogtown, St. Louis, Missouri
      March 17, 2004
      Cookie Mess “Cookie” Mess
      in which invalidating ingredients are used (said to characterize the majority of Messes performed in the United States)
      Bishop John Cummins Oakland, California June 17, 2002
      Cowboy Mess “Cowboy” Mess
      in which the presbyter and his ministers were all “vested” as cowboys and live poultry were placed about the altar
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Canada 2005
      Dance Mess “Dance” Mess
      in which participants dance around the Novus Ordo “table”
      Archbishop Anthony Pilla Kent State University Newman Center,
      Kent, Ohio
      June 16, 2003
      Dip It Yourself Mess “Dip It Yourself” Mess
      in which children dip their Novus Ordo cookie into — what? — milk, grape juice, wine?
      Novus Ordo Presbyter St. Martin de Corléans,
      Aosta, Italy
      2003
      Disco Mess “Disco” Mess
      in which a mob of presbyters “concelebrates” Mess in the “disco” style, with hands waving and bodies undulating before the Novus Ordo dinner table
      Novus Ordo Presbyters Plobsheim, France May 31, 2009
      Divine Mercy Mess “Divine Mercy” Mess
      in which participants act like charistmatics with hands swaying
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Various April 27, 2003
      Dorito Mess “Dorito” Mess
      in which a “Dorito” corn chip is used as matter
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Religious Education Congress,
      Cathedral, Los Angeles, California
      October 21, 2003
      Drum Mess “Drum” Mess
      in which the presbyter performs the Mess with clay pots, sesame stick, and snare drum on the “table”
      Presbyter Garry Boy Scout Meeting,
      Friedberg, Germany
      1999
      Easter Bunny Mess “Easter Bunny” Mess
      in which the presbyter concelebrates the Mess with an Easter bunny, who hands out chocolate eggs for “communion”
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Hartberg, Austria April 8, 2012
      Family Mess “Family” Mess
      in which the presbyter performs the Mess while the kids loll around the “sanctuary” bored out of their goards with their backs toward presbyter, and altar
      Presbyter Joseph Ziliak St. John the Baptist Parish,
      Newburgh, Indiana
      2004
      Fetish Mess “Fetish” Mess
      in which semi-naked natives wearing fetish feathers gather around the “sanctuary”
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Tom Gier Society of Our Lady of the Most Holy Trinity 2000
      Field Mess “Field” Mess
      in which the presbyter performs the Mess in a field while the kids loll around in the grass
      Polish Presbyter Poland May 24, 2004
      French Bread Mess “French Bread” Mess
      in which french bread is “elevated” while people squat around a circular coffee table
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Steve Kelly A Living Room in Los Angeles, California 1996
      Field Mess “Front Yard” Mess
      in which the presbyter takes his ease in the front yard while a female “homilist” does all the work
      Presbyter Raymond Thomas St. Mary/St. Francis Cabrini Church,
      Conneaut, Ohio
      Summer 2006
      Gay Mess “Gay” Mess
      in which presbyters gather around the bishop in the rainbow-colored flag, the Radical Gay Movement’s war banner
      Roger Cardinal Mahony St. Dominic’s Church,
      Eagle Rock, California
      February 4, 2001
      Guitar Mess “Guitar” Mess
      in which the presbyter himself “performs” Mess and the music on the profane guitar
      Novus Ordo Presbyter “Dan” University of Canberra, Australia,
      “Spiritual Meeting Place”
      2004
      Gym Mess “Gym” Mess
      in which “a joyful and creative liturgy designed by and for families with Gospel-centered messages geared toward children” is performed while children crowd around the Novus Ordo “table” Indian-style
      Novus Ordo Presbyter St. Joan of Arc Church, Minneapolis, Minnesota July 20, 2003
      Gymnastic Mess “Gymnastic” Mess
      in which gymnasts dressed in flimsy costumes perform during the performance of the Novus Ordo Mess
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Menzingen, Switzerland May 2, 2004
      Haystack Mess “Haystack” Mess
      in which the presbyter simulates Mess on a haystack
      Presbyter Jim Profit Guelph, Ontario, Canada June 1, 2008
      Hindu Mess “Hindu” Mess
      in which pagan Hindu girls dance around the altar chanting the Hindu om
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Thomas d’Sa and Newparish presbyter Toronto, Canada July 2, 2006
      Hoverboard Mess “Hoverboard” Mess
      in which the performer of the Mess “presides” from a hoverboard, which he rides up and down the center aisle
      Novus Ordo Presbyter San Pablo, Philippines December 24, 2015
      Ignatian Retreat Mess “Ignatian Retreat” Mess
      in which a semi-nude Novus Ordo Jesuit presbyter dances a Mess
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Robert Ver Eecke, S.J. Boston, Massachusetts September 9, 2003
      Indian Chief Mess “Indian Chief” Mess
      in which a Novus Ordo Jesuit presbyter dons an Indian chief’s headdress and performs the Mess
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Tekakwitha Conference, Tucson, Arizona 2005
      Indian Feather Mess “Indian Feather” Mess
      in which the Novus Ordo Archbishop of Denver sports Indian feathers and tom-toms
      Archbishop Charles Chaput Denver, Colorado August 4, 2003
      Juggler Mess “Juggler” Mess
      in which a clown-juggler juggles the “cookies” while the presbyter “performs” Mess in a circus
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Heller Circus Knie,
      Switzerland
      July 21, 2002
      Juvenile Mess “Juvenile” Mess
      in which seventh-grade girls prance around the “altar” while the presbyter performs “Mess” behind an altar frontal reading, “Treat others the way you would like to be treated,” enclosed in a big pink heart
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Laurie O’Toole Warrnambool, Victoria, Australia June 27, 2003
      Kitchen Table Mess “Kitchen Table” Mess
      in which Mess is performed on kitchen table with biscuits
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Austria October 31, 2003
      Kool-aid Mess “Kool-aid” Mess
      in which a Newchurch cardinal “consecrates” grape, cherry, and orange Kool-aid
      Newchurch Cardinal Roger Mahony Archdiocesan Pastoral Council Meeting
      Los Angeles
      February 13, 2007
      Life Teen Mess

      “Life Teen” Mess
      in which “Life Teen” charismatics worship the Novus Ordo “cookie”

      Novus Ordo Presbyter Various September 2, 2003
      Life Teen Mess

      “Low Dinner Table” Mess
      in which the Novus Ordo “Dinner Table” Is So Low that the presbyter has to perform the Mess kneeling

      Novus Ordo Presbyter Attard, Malta August 2014
      Menorah Mess “Menorah” Mess
      in which a Jewish Menorah is placed on the Novus Ordo “table”
      Archbishop Alfred Hughes Chapel of Notre Dame,
      New Orleans, Louisiana
      October 5, 2003
      Mother Earth Mess “Mother Earth” Mess
      in which a Novus Ordo Franciscan Sister of the Perpetual Adoration makes an offering to Goddess Mother Earth
      Novus Ordo Priestess Various August 12, 2003
      Mummers Mess “Mummers Mess”
      in which lectors and gift bearers are dressed up like Voodoo practitioners
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Robert Feeney Our Lady of Mt. Carmel,
      South Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
      December 31, 2003
      Nightclub Mess “Nightclub” Mess
      in which the performer dresses in a tuxedo and tells jokes
      Monsignor Reynolds Pompano Beach, Florida April 7, 2003
      Oecumenical Day Mess “Oecumenical” Mess
      in which a joint Protestant-Catholic oecumenical service is performed
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Gotthold Hasenhuttl Berlin June 1, 2003
      Pancake Mess “Pancake” Mess
      in which a vested priestess cuts the pancake “species,” assisted by a presbyter and a bishop, while a T-shirted acolyte uses an ice-cream scoop in the clay “chalice,” all this taking place on a table covered with a multicolored party tablecloth
      Novus Ordo Bishop Pedro Casaldaliga (in background) Goiania, Brazil,
      Jesuit Youth House
      2005
      Papal Buddha Mess Papal “Buddha” Mess
      in which Mess is celebrated with a Buddha atop the Novus Ordo “table”
      Pope John Paul II Assisi, Italy October 26, 1986
      Papal Clown Mess Papal “Clown” Mess
      in which clowns entertain in front of the pope on his throne
      Pope John Paul II St. Peter’s Square,
      Vatican City
      November 17, 2002
      Papal Hindu Mass Papal “Hindu” Mess
      in which what appear to be Hindu ceremonies are performed in front of the papal Mess
      Pope John Paul II New Delhi,
      India
      November 7, 1999
      Papal Nudie Mess Papal “Nudie” Mess
      in which a bare-breasted lectoress reads the Epistle in front of the pope and his clergy
      Pope John Paul II Papua New Guinea 1984
      Papal Sugar Cookie Mess I Papal “Sugar Cookie” Mess I
      in which JPII “consecrates” matter looking like a giant sugar cookie
      Pope John Paul II St. Peter’s Basilica,
      Vatican City
      September 4, 2003
      Papal Sugar Cookie Mess II Papal “Sugar Cookie” Mess II
      in which Benedict-Ratzinger “consecrates” matter looking like a giant sugar cookie
      Pope Benedict XVI Redemptoris Mater Seminary, 
      Rome
      April 21, 2005
      Papal Woodstock Mess IPapal Woodstock Mess II

      Papal Woodstock Mess III

      Papal “Woodstock” Mess
      at which youth, dressed in beachwear (if at all), lounge around on the grass looking bored
      Pope John Paul II XIIth World Youth Day 1997
      Patio Mess “Patio” Mess
      in which Mess is performed on a round patio table
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Paul Villeroy St. Augustine Parish, Signal Mountain, Tennessee July 11, 2004
      Peanut Butter Cookie Mess “Peanut Butter Cookie” Mess
      in which peanut-butter cookies are used for the matter
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Archdiocese in the Southern United States October 23, 2003
      Picnic Mess “Picnic” Mess
      in which the short-sleeved presbyter holds up a cookie and glass of Kool-Aid, with other plastic containers of Kool-Aid on the picnic table
      Novus Ordo Franciscan Presbyter Franciscan Profession, United States 2003
      Pink Panther Mess “Pink Panther” Mess
      in which a cutout of a pink panther, the school’s “spirit” mascot, was placed in front of the “table”
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Rhenne Mt. Carmel Academy,
      New Orleans, Louisiana
      2005
      Polka Mess “Polka” Mess
      in which sacred music is replaced by polkas, and the polka is danced around the Novus Ordo “table”
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Perkovich St. Peter’s Basilica,
      Vatican City
      1983
      Pontoon Mess “Pontoon” Mess
      in which Mess is performed on a pontoon raft lurching back and forth on a river at a summer camp
      Novus Ordo Pastor Joe Campbell Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church,
      LaFollette, Tennessee
      December 11, 2002
      Pool Mess “Pool” or “Paedophile” Mess
      in which Mess is performed on a TV table beside a swimming pool for semi-naked boys
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Tony Janton La Salle College High School,
      Wyndmoor, Pennsylvania
      July 15, 2014
      Potato Chip Mess “Potato Chip” Mess
      in which the matter is potato chips and grape juice, held not in sacred vessels, but in glass containers
      Novus Ordo Presbyter St. Rita’s Church,
      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
      November 20, 2003
      Priestess Mess “Priestess” Mess
      in which a woman plays the role of a presbyter and performs the Mess
      Presbyter Cooper St. Matthias Church,
      Milwaukee, Wisconsin
      March 25, 2003
      Pub Mess “Pub” Mess
      in which a presbyter performs Mess in a pub, accompanied by guitars and saxophones
      Novus Ordo Presbyter
      Sean Horrigan
      Mucky Duck Pub,
      Houston, Texas
      December 26, 2003
      Puppet Mess “Puppet” Mess
      in which a presbyter “performs” Mess using ventriloquism through “Charlie,” a dummy
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Douglas Sweet St. Joseph Church,
      Shreveport, Louisiana
      2003
      Pub Mess “Rabbit” Mess
      in which a presbyter “con”-celebrates Mess with Reggie “the Rabbit,” a professional rugby team mascot
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Jersey St. Michael Church,
      Darceyville, Australia
      September 29, 2013
      Sail MessSail Mess “Sail” Mess
      in which a bishop is consecrated on Novus Ordo “tables” made up like ships’ sails
      Bishop Michael Guyard France November 13, 2003
      Sandwich Mess “Sandwich” Mess
      in which the presbyter “consecrates” a bologna sandwich
      Presbyter Burnier Jesuit Youth House (Casa da Juventude),
      Goiania, Brazil
      2005
      Sitting Bull Mess “Sitting Bull” Mess
      in which the presbyter sits while performing the Mess before what he supposedly believes is his God, “before Whom every knee should bow”
      Polish Novus Ordo Presbyter Karibo,
      Tanzania
      1999
      Skull Mess “Skull” Mess
      in which a grotesque skull image was projected on a screen above the altar, and a man and woman, back to back and totally naked, were projected on the same screen
      Novus Ordo Presbyter St. Andrä, Graz, Austria March 25, 2005
      Soda Mess “Soda” Mess
      in which Mountain Dew is served in plastic champagne classes for the “fruit of the vine”
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Matamata,
      New Zealand
      January 28, 2002
      Sponge Bob “Sponge Bob” Mess
      in which a Sponge Bob cartoon figure decorates the Novus Ordo “sanctuary”
      Novus Ordo Presbyter St. Barnabas Church,
      Long Beach, California
      June 7, 2009
      Spook Mess “Spook” Mess
      in which kids dress as little devils, etc., gather around the Novus Ordo “table”
      Novus Ordo Presbyter St. Charles Borromeo Church,
      Woonsocket, Rhode Island
      October 24, 2003
      Spring Water Mess “Spring Water” Mess
      in which the Transitional Deacon of the Mess, vested in shorts and running shoes, offers a bottle of spring water with a straw in it
      Presbyter Brian Christianson and Transitional Deacon Jim Hoener Schipol Airport, Amsterdam August 24, 2005
      Squat Mess “Squat” Mess
      in which the presbyter performs Mess squatting down in front of a “stool-altar” in the woods
      Jesuit Presbyter Jacek Olczyk Poland September 21, 2005
      Picnic Mess “Star Wars” Mess
      in which the presbyter wields a light saber like Darth Vadar
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Christoph Nobs St. Stephen, Putzbrunn, Germany June 8, 2013
      Stock Exchange Mess “Stock Exchange” Mess
      in which a presbyter simulated a Novus Ordo service in front of the Manila Stock Exchange’s tote board
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Stock Exchange,
      Manila, Philippines
      January 2, 2008
      Tango Mess “Tango” Mess
      in which danceuses cavort to the beat of a steel drum band
      Novus Ordo Presbyter St. Monica Church,
      Rochester, New York
      June 2, 2003
      Tet Mess “Tet” Mess
      in which danceuses trip the light fantastic before the Novus Ordo table right out of a scene from an oriental restaurant
      Novus Ordo Bishop Allen Vigneron St. Anthony Church,
      Oakland, California
      January 2004
      Vestal Virgin Mess “Vestal Virgin” Mess
      in which Novus Ordo nuns dance like pagan Vestal Virgins during the dedication of a Novus Ordo square “table”
      Roger Cardinal Mahony Cathedral,
      Los Angeles, California
      September 6, 2002
      Voodoo Mess “Voodoo” Mess
      at which witch doctors of voodoo participate, and animist (pagan) practices are included
      Auspices of the Archbishop of Sao Paulo Our Lady of Achiropita Parish,
      Sao Paulo, Brazil
      May 31, 2003
      Washtub Mess “Washtub” Mess
      at which Newchurchers congregate around a washtub altar
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Grosskrotzenburg, Germany August 2001
      Wildflower Mess “Wildflower” Mess
      in which German rye is served on rocks amidst wildflowers
      Novus Ordo Presbyter Ignatian Hike, Jesuit Community University,
      Freiburg, Germany
      August 24, 2003
      Witch Mess “Witch” Mess
      at which white witches assemble in coven with approval of the Novus Ordo bishop
      Novus Ordo Priestesses Oakland, California March 31, 2003
      Womyn Mess “Womyn” Mess
      at which Novus Ordo “table” servettes, lectresses, gift-bearers, etc., were all adult womyn, vested in Novus Ordo albettes
      Novus Ordo Priestesses National Council of Catholic Women,
      Washington, D.C.
      October 31, 1999